Mission Statement

To provide safe, effective health care with the very highest level of customer service.

What is Registered Massage Therapy?

Registered Massage Therapists (RMT’s) are regulated healthcare professionals in British Columbia.  RMT’s treat soft-tissue dysfunction in the body by first reviewing your medical history, assessing your individual physiologic needs, and then using manual techniques, will realign joints, decrease muscle spasms or tension, correct circulatory and lymphatic flow, and decrease nervous system dysfunction.

“Massage therapy” means the health profession in which a person provides, for the purposes of developing, maintaining, rehabilitating or augmenting physical function, or relieving pain or promoting health, the services of (a) assessment of soft tissue and joints of the body, and (b) treatment and prevention of physical dysfunction, injury, pain and disorders of soft tissue and joints of the body by manipulation, mobilization and other manual methods. 

In order for RMT’s to become licensed under the Health Professions Act, they must successfully complete an extensive program of education and training to become competent in Anatomy & Physiology, Pathology, Neurology, Kinesiology, Hydrotherapy, Clinical Assessment, Manual Lymph Drainage Treatment, Therapeutic Exercise, Joint Mobilization, Systemic Dysfunction, Sports Massage and Athletic Treatment, Medication, Surgery, Nutrition, and Pain and Stress Management.  This training is between 2200-3000 hours on average.

Registration with their regulatory body, the College of Massage Therapists of British Columbia, is mandatory following the registration exams, as is the continuing education and upgrading of knowledge and skills.  Only these registrants may use the title Registered Massage Therapist (RMT) or Massage Therapist (MT).

How Does Massage Therapy Help?

Massage therapy treatments directly and indirectly effect muscular, nervous system, and circulatory system functions. By realigning joints, decreasing muscle spasms or tension, correcting circulatory and lymphatic flow, and decreasing inflammation and nervous system dysfunction, your symptoms can be reduced or eliminated.

Massage therapy includes your recommended home care regimen of hydrotherapy, stretching and remedial exercise.

“Massage therapy” means the health profession in which a person provides, for the purposes of developing, maintaining, rehabilitating or augmenting physical function, or relieving pain or promoting health, the services of (a) assessment of soft tissue and joints of the body, and (b) treatment and prevention of physical dysfunction, injury, pain and disorders of soft tissue and joints of the body by manipulation, mobilization and other manual methods. 

In order for RMT’s to become licensed under the Health Professions Act, they must successfully complete an extensive program of education and training to become competent in Anatomy & Physiology, Pathology, Neurology, Kinesiology, Hydrotherapy, Clinical Assessment, Manual Lymph Drainage Treatment, Therapeutic Exercise, Joint Mobilization, Systemic Dysfunction, Sports Massage and Athletic Treatment, Medication, Surgery, Nutrition, and Pain and Stress Management.  This training is between 2200-3000 hours on average.

Registration with their regulatory body, the College of Massage Therapists of British Columbia, is mandatory following the registration exams, as is the continuing education and upgrading of knowledge and skills.  Only these registrants may use the title Registered Massage Therapist (RMT) or Massage Therapist (MT).

Registered Massage Therapists (RMT’s) are regulated healthcare professionals in British Columbia.  RMT’s treat soft-tissue dysfunction in the body by first reviewing your medical history, assessing your individual physiologic needs, and then using manual techniques, will realign joints, decrease muscle spasms or tension, correct circulatory and lymphatic flow, and decrease nervous system dysfunction.

“Massage therapy” means the health profession in which a person provides, for the purposes of developing, maintaining, rehabilitating or augmenting physical function, or relieving pain or promoting health, the services of (a) assessment of soft tissue and joints of the body, and (b) treatment and prevention of physical dysfunction, injury, pain and disorders of soft tissue and joints of the body by manipulation, mobilization and other manual methods. 

In order for RMT’s to become licensed under the Health Professions Act, they must successfully complete an extensive program of education and training to become competent in Anatomy & Physiology, Pathology, Neurology, Kinesiology, Hydrotherapy, Clinical Assessment, Manual Lymph Drainage Treatment, Therapeutic Exercise, Joint Mobilization, Systemic Dysfunction, Sports Massage and Athletic Treatment, Medication, Surgery, Nutrition, and Pain and Stress Management.  This training is between 2200-3000 hours on average.

Registration with their regulatory body, the College of Massage Therapists of British Columbia, is mandatory following the registration exams, as is the continuing education and upgrading of knowledge and skills.  Only these registrants may use the title Registered Massage Therapist (RMT) or Massage Therapist (MT).

Registered Massage Therapists (RMT’s) are regulated healthcare professionals in British Columbia.  RMT’s treat soft-tissue dysfunction in the body by first reviewing your medical history, assessing your individual physiologic needs, and then using manual techniques, will realign joints, decrease muscle spasms or tension, correct circulatory and lymphatic flow, and decrease nervous system dysfunction.

“Massage therapy” means the health profession in which a person provides, for the purposes of developing, maintaining, rehabilitating or augmenting physical function, or relieving pain or promoting health, the services of (a) assessment of soft tissue and joints of the body, and (b) treatment and prevention of physical dysfunction, injury, pain and disorders of soft tissue and joints of the body by manipulation, mobilization and other manual methods. 

In order for RMT’s to become licensed under the Health Professions Act, they must successfully complete an extensive program of education and training to become competent in Anatomy & Physiology, Pathology, Neurology, Kinesiology, Hydrotherapy, Clinical Assessment, Manual Lymph Drainage Treatment, Therapeutic Exercise, Joint Mobilization, Systemic Dysfunction, Sports Massage and Athletic Treatment, Medication, Surgery, Nutrition, and Pain and Stress Management.  This training is between 2200-3000 hours on average.

Registration with their regulatory body, the College of Massage Therapists of British Columbia, is mandatory following the registration exams, as is the continuing education and upgrading of knowledge and skills.  Only these registrants may use the title Registered Massage Therapist (RMT) or Massage Therapist (MT).